Articles

Viscometer Testing

Viscometer Testing

We love liquids. Water, coffee, syrup, shakes. Though they flow freely and have a set volume, liquids do not have a set shape. Some food products and cosmetics may appear solid. However, they contain liquid properties that are vital to customer experience. These products are considered viscoelastic products.    Take butter, cream cheese, and the filling in protein bars as examples. Even gummy bears cannot hide their liquid properties when a bag of them is left inadvertently in the sun on a warm day.   Often, we think of viscosity as a measurement of a liquid’s thickness. We understand honey is a...

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Water Activity vs. Moisture Content

Water Activity vs. Moisture Content

Water is everywhere and in everything. About 71% of the earth’s surface is water. The human body is composed of roughly 60% water. Plants, animals, and microbes all require water to live and grow. Hence, knowing the amount of water in a product helps predetermine the product’s stability, shelf-life, processing, and microorganism growth. With its charged molecular structure, water readily bonds with other asymmetrically charged molecules. However, water is not stuck in a bond. It readily dissolves bonds, too. Especially if a more attractive bond is close by or if conditions are right for water to change state like moving...

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Moisture Content Test

Moisture Content Test

Moisture content is a basic indicator of quality. In agriculture, it indicates soil productivity: In lumber, wood workability. And in foods, dietary supplements, and cosmetics, it is a quality control indicator of product stability, shelf-life, processing, and labeling requirements. Is there a difference between water content and moisture content? Generally, no. For most purposes, moisture content refers to the total amount of water (unbonded and bonded) in a product sample. Water’s chemical makeup allows it to readily bond with asymmetrically charged molecules, including other water molecules. Water molecules bonded together are free moving or active water. Water bonded physically to...

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Water Activity (aw) Test

Water Activity (aw) Test

To grow, all things need food and water. Without water, life does not exist. One molecule of water is composed of two hydrogen atoms bonded with one oxygen atom. Water is required by all cells to: Transport oxygen, nutrients, and wastes,  Support DNA and protein cell structure, and Buffer drastic changes in pH levels. Water’s molecular structure with one positively charged side and one negatively charged side allows water to bond with other asymmetrically charged molecules to do things like support cell structure. In the case of ‘free water’ or unbonded water, the asymmetric charge breaks up or dissolves bonded...

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FDA Registered Facility

FDA Registered Facility

Imagine living in the 19th century. It was an age of industry, experimentation, and scientific discovery. Some advancements, however, were not always in the best interests of public health and safety. According to a federal government history site, the United States government began using chemical analysis to monitor the safety of food products as early as 1848. The passing of the Pure Food and Drugs Act in 1906, gave the federal government regulatory power to protect the public from misbranded or adulterated food and drugs. The regulatory body in charge became officially known as the US Food and Drug Administration...

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